Established as a registered Canadian charity, Traffic Injury Research Foundation (TIRF) is an independent, road safety research institute. TIRF conducts scientific research to identify the human causes and effects of road crashes. It develops and evaluates programs and policies to address them, and shares research findings through a wealth of free educational resources and education programs.

Recent Releases

Collisions Among Fatally Injured Drivers of Different Age Groups, 2000-2014

TIRF is pleased to announce the release a new fact sheet on trends among age-related fatalities and fatally injured drivers, prepared in partnership with Desjardins Insurance. Data for this fact sheet are derived from TIRF’s National Fatality Database from 2000-2014 which is jointly funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada and Desjardins.

Status of Alcohol-Impaired Driving in Canada

The Traffic Injury Research Foundation (TIRF) published a new report on the Status of Alcohol-Impaired Driving in Canada. It was made possible with funding from Beer Canada through its continued support of Change the Conversation. The report examines current data and trends in alcohol-impaired driving across Canada.

Status of Alcohol-Impaired Driving in Canada

The Traffic Injury Research Foundation (TIRF) has released a new report on the Status of Alcohol-Impaired Driving in Canada. It was made possible with funding from Beer Canada through its continued support of Change the Conversation. The report examined current data and trends in alcohol-impaired driving across Canada.

Senior Drivers & Automated Vehicles: Knowledge, Attitudes & Practice

A new study by the Traffic Injury Research Foundation (TIRF) suggests senior drivers in Canada could play a leadership role in the safe adoption of semi-automated vehicles as Canadian roadways transition from traditional vehicles to increasingly automated vehicles. The study, funded by the Toyota Canada Foundation, analyzed data regarding the knowledge, attitudes and practices of senior drivers collected from focus groups, as well as an online survey of 2,662 Canadians.

Senior Drivers & Automated Vehicles: Knowledge, Attitudes & Practices Executive Summary

Executive summary: A new study by the Traffic Injury Research Foundation (TIRF) suggests senior drivers in Canada could play a leadership role in the safe adoption of semi-automated vehicles as Canadian roadways transition from traditional vehicles to increasingly automated vehicles. The study, funded by the Toyota Canada Foundation, analyzed data regarding the knowledge, attitudes and practices of senior drivers collected from focus groups, as well as an online survey of 2,662 Canadians.

Conducteurs âgés et véhicules automatisés : connaissances, attitudes et habitudes

Une nouvelle étude de la Fondation de recherches sur les blessures de la route (FRBR) suggère que les conducteurs âgés au Canada pourraient jouer un rôle de chefs de file dans l’adoption sécuritaire des véhicules semi- automatisés, alors que les véhicules traditionnels sont progressivement remplacés par des véhicules automatisés sur les routes canadiennes.

Conducteurs âgés et véhicules automatisés : connaissances, attitudes et habitudes Sommaire

Sommaire – Une nouvelle étude de la Fondation de recherches sur les blessures de la route (FRBR) suggère que les conducteurs âgés au Canada pourraient jouer un rôle de chefs de file dans l’adoption sécuritaire des véhicules semi- automatisés, alors que les véhicules traditionnels sont progressivement remplacés par des véhicules automatisés sur les routes canadiennes.